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Joshua Craig Poole

Joshua Craig Poole was born on 27 Jun 1898 in the Scuffletown township, Laurens county, South Carolina, the seventh surviving child of Thomas Pitts Poole (1861-1926) and Jemmie Elizabeth Alexander (1861-1937). 1

On 12 September 1918 Josh was required to register for the World War I draft. He reported his occupation as farmer, living at Rte 2, Laurens. The registrar reported him to be of medium build, with brown eyes and red hair.2

The 1920 Census enumerates Joshua as a farm laborer, living with his parents in Scuffletown, along with his elder brother Martin and younger sister Mattie Bobo.3

English Ancestry of the Pettypool Family of Colonial Virginia

A new publication, English Ancestry of the Pettypool Family of Colonial Virginia, by Carolyn Hartsough is available for download at This 137 page document describes the origins of the Pettypool surname in medieval England, and traces the family from its Essex roots through the departure of William Pettypool for colonial Virginia in the 17th century. An excerpt from the paper follows:

Chance Favors the Prepared Mind

One of “three youngest Sons”: Identifying a
Missing 18th Century Pettypool Family Member

Carolyn Hartsough

My favorite genealogical moments involve discovering the identity of extended family members who are known to exist but haven’t been identifiable using easily accessed historical sources and “reasonably exhaustive research.”1 Although one such individual has eluded my best efforts since I started to research the early branches of the Pettypool family over 35 years ago, a concentrated review of one Pettypool family branch along with a chance “hit” on an online database seems to have solved the mystery.

I finally published “The William Pettypool Family of Southside Virginia: Lineage Review Based on Current Review of Evidence” in 2003 knowing that some lines had not been fully extended and that one line, in particular, was missing an un-named heir. The individual in question was a son of William(4) Pettypool (ca 1720 – ca 1774), fourth in a line of Pettypool men all named William, the first of whom was the mid-17th century English immigrant to colonial Virginia.2

Nina Pitts Poole

A life cut short, 1887- 1914

Nina, the second child born to Thomas Pitts Pool and Jemmie Alexander of the Scuffletown township of Laurens County, SC, arrived on Thursday 17 February 1887. The 1900 Federal census finds 13 year old Nina “at school”. 1

Nina exhibited skill with flower arranging. The 26 November 1902 issue of the Laurens Advertiser noted that they were “…indebted to Miss Nina Poole for a rarely beautiful bouquet of geraniums, ferns and other conservatory plants. One seldom sees such choice flowers”.2

By March 1905, Nina was a student at Lander College3 in Greenwood, SC. The 8 March 1905 Laurens Advertiser reported that “Mr. T. P. Poole went to Greenwood Saturday to visit his daughter, Miss Nina, who is attending school there.4

Like Father, Like Son

In the summer of 1912, James Furman Poole, called Furman by his family, had a more complicated visit to North Carolina than he expected. As the 3 July 1912 edition of the Laurens Advertiser noted, his intention was to attend the wedding of James A. Poole:

Mr. Furman Poole left last Friday [June 28] for Benson, NC to attend the marriage of his cousin James A. Poole of Clinton [SC] and Miss Dora Hodges.

James Augustus Poole was the son of William Augustus Poole (1854-1928) and Mary Duval. He was Furman’s second cousin.

On Monday July first, Furman’s father Thomas Pitts Poole received a message:

Arthur Russell Pool

Arthur Russell was born to George B. Pool and Mary Farrow on 29 December, 1870, their fourth child.  Nothing is known of his life until 1887, when a somber announcement appeared in the Laurens Advertiser:

On Saturday last, Russel Pool, a 15 year old son of Mr.  George Pool of this place, while handling a shot gun, accidentally let it fall and the contents of  both barrels were discharged into his right side and thigh. Fears are entertained for his recovery.

Approximate to the Truth- Berry P. Pool, c. 1792- 1847

When you follow two separate chains of thought, Watson, you will find some point of intersection which should approximate to the truth
Sherlock Holmes, “The Disappearance of Lady Frances Carfax”, Sir  A. Conan Doyle

Berry Pool of Laurens County, South Carolina is well documented as my 2nd great grandfather.  The paper trail from me to him is littered with enough primary evidence to satisfy even the most scrupulous of modern genealogists.

And the pedigree of a man who signed his name “Seth Petty Pool” and who settled in Laurens County, South Carolina circa 1785 has been well established by multiple researchers of the American Pettypool family.

But the “point of intersection” of those two “chains of thought” is a deceptively simple question:  Is Berry Pool the son of Seth Petty Pool?

Journals of the County and Intermediate Court 1786- 1790, Laurens County, SC

The South Carolina Department of Archives and History has a microfilm of the Journals of the County and Intermediate Court 1786- 1790  for  Laurens county.  “The County Court Act of 1785 established county courts… ‘to hear and determine all causes at the common law’… where the debt or damages did not exceed fifty pounds… all personal actions where the damages did not exceed twenty pounds… and to hear criminal cases where judgment would not call for the loss of life or corporal punishment”.1

The journal is interesting reading, providing insight into how our ancestors sought to govern themselves at the dawning of America as a nation.  The Treaty of Paris had formally ended English claims on America just three years before this journal opens.  The court cases have a very “English” cast, reflecting a society in transition.

An important item on the court’s agenda for 17 March 1786  was regulating “Publick Taverns”.2