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Mattie Bobo Poole (1900- 1924)

Mattie Bobo Poole was born Saturday 17 March 1900 to Thomas Pitts Poole and Jemmie Elizabeth Alexander. She was the eighth, and final, surviving child born to Thomas and Jemmie.1

The 14 April 1915 edition of the Laurens Advertiser reported on the “successful individual contestants in several departments of the county fair Friday”. Listed in the School Work category was “Booklet- Mattie Bobo Poole Sandy Spring.”2

The 8 November 1916 edition of the Laurens Advertiser reported that they were “sorry to learn that Miss Mattie Bobo Poole is sick with pneumonia”. She had recovered fully by summer, and when the 25 July 1917 edition of the Laurens Advertiser reported the activities of a “Sabbath School Convention” to which the local churches sent delegates, Mattie and her eldest brother Martin were the two delegates from Langston Baptist church. In addition, at the close of the convention, Mattie was selected as the “superintendent of elementary work in the district” for the coming year.3

Colwell Pettypool, son of William(4) and Mary Caldwell of Lunenburg County, Virginia

Carolyn Hartsough

16 December 2015,  revised 20 December 2015

William(4) and Mary (Caldwell) Pettypool of Lunenburg County, Virginia are known to have produced at least five sons.1   The eldest of the group, Colwell (presumably named for his maternal grandfather), was the only one to have lived out his life in Virginia, likely in part because of his favored status as the first-borne male.  He was to reap the benefits of primogeniture, or the inheritance rights of the oldest male child to the exclusion of any female and male younger siblings.

Edward Caldwell, Mary’s father, had designated both of his grandchildren, “Colwell Petepool and William Petepool,” as recipients of land he had deeded for “life use” to William(4) and Mary in 1748.2  However, when the property was divided as part of a series of transactions on 25 June 1773, Colwell received 320 acres of a 420-acre plot and William Jr. only 100 acres (which Colwell immediately proceeded to buy for 100 pounds.)3

The Elusive George Pool

The Census of 1790 and 1800 enumerate a George Pool living in Spartanburg county, South Carolina. Using the Census age brackets, he was born before 1774.1 The family in 1800 consisted of one male age under 10 years, one male age 26-44 (presumably George) and four females age less than 10 years, one female age 10-15, and one female 26- 44 (presumably the spouse).

George Pool of Spartanburg does not appear in the Census of 1810 or 1820, at least in Spartanburg or Laurens counties. The next appearance of a George Pool is in the 1830 Census, in Laurens county, South Carolina.2 While it is tempting to connect the two, I do not believe that there is sufficient circumstantial evidence to support a connection.

Seth Pool, Junior

We first suspect that there were two men named “Seth Pool” in the Laurens county area in the early 1800’s while examining the 1819 Probate papers of Robert Pool.1 In the sales papers are references to sales to “Seth Pool” and a sale to “William Pool for Seth Pool”. This suspicion is confirmed in the 1822 Probate papers of William Petty Pool, when sales are noted to both “Seth Pool” and “Seth Pool Sen’r”.2

Elizabeth R. Poole

As with her brother John Belton Poole,  tradition describes Elizabeth as the daughter of Robert Pool and a granddaughter of Seth Petty Pool (c. 1754- 1837) of Laurens county, South Carolina.  This tradition is recorded in the book- Bessie P. Lamb, Mary-Mack Poole Ezell, A Genealogical History of the Poole, Langston, Mason Families and Kindred Line of Upper South Carolina, 1931- on page 12:

(2) Robert Poole and His Children:  Robert Poole son of (1) Seth Poole, married Elizabeth Davis…. His children were (3) Belton (1816-) and (3) Elizabeth R. (Sept. 17, 1818).

To date, no independent confirmation of this linage has been found.  The children of Seth Petty Pool (d. 1837) were not fully enumerated, and Robert Pool has been found only in scattered citations from 1810 through 1815;  has not been reliably located in any Census; and his probate in 18191 does not list any family members.

Elizabeth was born 9 March, 1817.2  Sometime before 1840, she married William H. Fowler.3

John Belton Poole

By tradition, Belton Poole is the son of Robert Pool and a grandson of Seth Petty Pool (c. 1754- 1837) of Laurens county, South Carolina. This tradition is recorded in the book- Bessie P. Lamb, Mary-Mack Poole Ezell, A GenealogicaL History of the Poole, Langston, Mason Families and Kindred Line of Upper South Carolina, 1931, on page 12:

(2) Robert Poole and His Children: Robert Poole son of (1) Seth Poole, married Elizabeth Davis…. His children were (3) Belton (1816-) and (3) Elizabeth R. (Sept. 17, 1818).

To date, no independent confirmation of this linage has been found. The children of Seth Petty Pool (d. 1837) were not fully enumerated, and Robert Pool has been found only in scattered citations from 1810 through 1815; has not been reliably located in any Census; and his probate in 1819 1 does not list any family members.

Joshua Craig Poole

Joshua Craig Poole was born on 27 Jun 1898 in the Scuffletown township, Laurens county, South Carolina, the seventh surviving child of Thomas Pitts Poole (1861-1926) and Jemmie Elizabeth Alexander (1861-1937). 1

On 12 September 1918 Josh was required to register for the World War I draft. He reported his occupation as farmer, living at Rte 2, Laurens. The registrar reported him to be of medium build, with brown eyes and red hair.2

The 1920 Census enumerates Joshua as a farm laborer, living with his parents in Scuffletown, along with his elder brother Martin and younger sister Mattie Bobo.3

English Ancestry of the Pettypool Family of Colonial Virginia

A new publication, English Ancestry of the Pettypool Family of Colonial Virginia, by Carolyn Hartsough is available for download at http://www.pettypool.com/England/index.html. This 137 page document describes the origins of the Pettypool surname in medieval England, and traces the family from its Essex roots through the departure of William Pettypool for colonial Virginia in the 17th century. An excerpt from the paper follows:

Chance Favors the Prepared Mind

One of “three youngest Sons”: Identifying a
Missing 18th Century Pettypool Family Member

Carolyn Hartsough

My favorite genealogical moments involve discovering the identity of extended family members who are known to exist but haven’t been identifiable using easily accessed historical sources and “reasonably exhaustive research.”1 Although one such individual has eluded my best efforts since I started to research the early branches of the Pettypool family over 35 years ago, a concentrated review of one Pettypool family branch along with a chance “hit” on an online database seems to have solved the mystery.

I finally published “The William Pettypool Family of Southside Virginia: Lineage Review Based on Current Review of Evidence” in 2003 knowing that some lines had not been fully extended and that one line, in particular, was missing an un-named heir. The individual in question was a son of William(4) Pettypool (ca 1720 – ca 1774), fourth in a line of Pettypool men all named William, the first of whom was the mid-17th century English immigrant to colonial Virginia.2

Nina Pitts Poole

A life cut short, 1887- 1914

Nina, the second child born to Thomas Pitts Pool and Jemmie Alexander of the Scuffletown township of Laurens County, SC, arrived on Thursday 17 February 1887. The 1900 Federal census finds 13 year old Nina “at school”. 1

Nina exhibited skill with flower arranging. The 26 November 1902 issue of the Laurens Advertiser noted that they were “…indebted to Miss Nina Poole for a rarely beautiful bouquet of geraniums, ferns and other conservatory plants. One seldom sees such choice flowers”.2

By March 1905, Nina was a student at Lander College3 in Greenwood, SC. The 8 March 1905 Laurens Advertiser reported that “Mr. T. P. Poole went to Greenwood Saturday to visit his daughter, Miss Nina, who is attending school there.4